Border Agreement Definition

For more information on internal border controls, see the judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union in Case C-444/17 (Arib) and in the Commission reports COM(2010) 554 on internal borders, COM(2012) 230 on the functioning of the Schengen area and COM(2013) 326 on the functioning of the Schengen area. The Schengen provisions abolish controls at the Union`s internal borders and will strengthen controls at the external borders according to a uniform set of rules. These rules cover several areas: any person, regardless of nationality, may cross internal borders without being subject to border controls. However, the competent national authorities may also carry out police checks at internal borders and in border areas, provided that such checks do not amount to border crossing controls. This is particularly true in cases where controls are not intended to be border controls and are based on general police information and experience. The Schengen Agreement (German: /ˈʃɛŋ assister/) is a treaty that led to the creation of the European Schengen Area, in which internal border controls were largely abolished. It was signed on 14 June 1985 near the city of Schengen, Luxembourg, by five of the ten Member States of the european Economic Community at the time. . . .