Terms Of The Versailles Agreement

The result of these competing and sometimes contradictory objectives among the victors was a compromise that did not satisfy anyone and, in particular, Germany was neither pacified nor reconciled, nor was it permanently weakened. The problems posed by the treaty would lead to the Locarno Treaties, which improved relations between Germany and the other European powers, and the renegotiation of the reparation system that led to the Dawes plan, the boys` plan and the permanent postponement of reparations at the Lausanne conference in 1932. The treaty was sometimes cited as the cause of the Second World War: although its real effects were not as severe as feared, its conditions gave rise to great resentment in Germany, which led to the rise of the NSDAP. The Paris Peace Conference opened on 18 January 1919, an important date marking the anniversary of the coronation of German Emperor William I, which took place at the Palace of Versailles at the end of the Franco-German War in 1871. Prussia`s victory in this conflict led to German unification and the conquest of the provinces of Alsace and Lorraine by France. In 1919, France and its Prime Minister Georges Clemenceau had not forgotten the humiliating loss and wanted to avenge it in the new peace agreement. In January 1919, two months after the end of the fighting of the First World War, a conference was convened at Versailles, the former domain of the French monarchy outside Paris, to draw up the terms of a peace treaty to officially end the conflict. Although representatives of almost… Read more During the wording of the treaty, the British wanted Germany to abolish compulsory military service, but for a voluntary army to maintain. The French wanted Germany to maintain a military military army of up to 200,000 men to justify maintaining a similar force. Thus the allocation of 100,000 volunteers in the contract was a compromise between the British and French positions. Germany, on the other hand, considered the terms to be devoid of any potential enemy. [173] Bernadotte Everly Schmitt wrote that “there is no reason to believe that allied governments were dishonest when they declared at the beginning of Part V of the Treaty …

that in order to facilitate a general reduction in the armament of all nations, Germany had to disarm first. The absence of American ratification of the treaty or membership of the League of Nations did not allow France to disarm, which gave rise to a German desire for disarmament. [73] Schmitt argued that if the four allies had remained united, they could really have forced Germany to disarm, and the German will and the ability to resist other provisions of the treaty would have diminished accordingly. [174] On January 8, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson edited the post-war goals, the Fourteen Points.